I am a Caregiver

Brain injury doesn’t happen to just one person but to the whole family.

Something happens – an accident, an illness – and suddenly, a brain injury changes everything. Early on, it can be like entering a new world with its own language; with time, it can be hard to understand why your loved one acts as they do or how to best support their progress.

You find you need to learn about services you never heard of, and through all of this, you need to take care of yourself so you can be there for the long haul. 

To learn more about the importance of taking care of yourself read our Self-Care and Resilience Quick Guide here.

 

We Can Help you Sort Things Out

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For Seniors

Falls are the leading cause of brain injury, and senior adults are at greater risk of falling and being hospitalized for that injury than any other group.  Recognizing a brain injury in older people can be difficult because the natural effects of aging and the challenges of brain injury overlap. Learning the effects of the injury can help get the right care; learning about resources can help get the right supports.

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For Children

Brain injury symptoms in children and teens are similar to those experienced by adults, but the functional impact can be very different. Children are not small adults; the brain of a child is still developing. To learn more visit our children: What to Expect?  section of our website.

 

For Adults

The news that a loved one has sustained a brain injury – whether that person is your spouse, a sibling, adult child, or a good friend – can be confusing and scary.  Each brain is different and the effects of an injury can be temporary for some, and extensive and long term for others.  Getting educated can help you ask the right questions and find the right services, no matter if it’s a concussion or a more severe injury or when it happened.

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Resource Request Form

Need more information? Let us help.  Complete the Resource Request form or call 1-800-444-6443.

Events for Caregivers

Caregiver Forum

Learn more about this annual event that  includes education on topics related to care giving, community resources, coping skills, self-care and time for networking with others.

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